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2019 National Theatre Connections Festival premieres ten brand new plays staged by young people

Ten UK school and youth theatre companies have been chosen to bring their productions of ten brand new plays to the 2019 National Theatre Connections Festival, which takes place in the Dorfman Theatre from 25-29 June.

Connections is the largest youth theatre festival in the UK which celebrates new writing for young people aged 13-19. Ten new plays by both established and emerging contemporary playwrights including Ben Bailey Smith, Lajaune Lincoln, Katherine Soper and Dawn King have been exclusively commissioned for young people to stage and perform at this year’s Festival.

Over 6,500 young people have taken part in Connections this year, with the ten plays being premiered by 273 youth theatre companies and schools across the UK. All the companies had the opportunity to transfer their production to one of 30 leading Partner Theatres across the UK, from Eden Court in Inverness, to the Lyric Belfast, and the Theatre Royal Plymouth.Ten companies are selected to perform at the National Theatre between 25-29 June to represent the range of exciting work being produced across the UK. Young people are involved with all aspects of creating and staging the play and take on a variety of backstage and off-stage roles, from operating lights and sound to set and costume design and stage management.

Rufus Norris, Director of the National Theatre said, “National Theatre Connections brings together young theatre-makers from across the UK with today’s most exciting playwrights. I look forward to watching the ten companies perform at this year’s Festival, as a reflection of the fantastic variety of productions which have been taking place in every corner of the UK throughout the year. We hope to inspire more young people in the art of theatre-making and the huge variety of backstage and offstage roles involved in creating a production”.

The productions invited to appear at the NT in the final week of this year’s Festival are:

Tuesday 25 June in the Dorfman Theatre

7pm – Variations by Katie Hims performed by Outwood Academy, Hemsworth (West Yorkshire)

8.30pm – Flesh by Rob Drummond performed by Rare Studio Liverpool

Wednesday 26 June in the Dorfman Theatre

7pm – Class by Ben Bailey Smith & Lajaune Lincoln performed by Easy Street Theatre Company (Sheffield)

8.30pm – Stuff by Tom Wells performed by Bolingbroke Academy Theatre Company (Wandsworth, London)

Thursday 27 June in the Dorfman Theatre

7pm – The Small Hours by Katherine Soper performed by Kildare Youth Theatre (County Kildare, Republic of Ireland)

8.30pm – terra / earth by Nell Leyshon & choreography by Anthony Missen performed by ACTS (Wolverhampton)

Friday 28 June in the Dorfman Theatre

7pm – Salt by Dawn King performed by Dimensions Performance Academy (South Wales)

8.30pm – Chaos by Laura Lomas performed by Glasgow Acting Academy SCIO

Saturday 29 June in the Dorfman Theatre

7pm – Ageless by Benjamin Kuffuor performed by Gulbenkian (Canterbury)

8.30pm – The Sad Club by Luke Barnes & music by Adam Pleeth performed by Hall for Cornwall (Truro, Cornwall)

All performances will be captioned.

Tickets are £5 each and are on sale from Friday 24th May. To book tickets, visit www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/connections

Connections 2019

Applications are now open to take part in next year’s Connections Festival. The National Theatre is looking for 300 school and youth theatre companies across the UK to take part. For more information and to sign up, please visit nationaltheatre.org.uk/connections

The ten new plays for this year’s Festival are:

STUFF

by Tom Wells

Vinny’s organising a surprise birthday party for his mate, Anita. It’s not going well: his choice of venue is a bit misguided, Anita’s not keen on leaving the house, and everyone else has their own stuff going on. Maybe a surprise party wasn’t the best idea?

A play about trying (but not really managing) to help.

VARIATIONS

by Katie Hims

Thirteen-year-old Alice wishes her life was completely different. She wakes up one morning to find that her life is different. In fact, it’s so different that all she wants to do is get back to normality. But how does she do that?
A play about family, string theory and breakfast.

CLASS

by Ben Bailey Smith & Lajaune Lincoln

It’s school election time and while most of the school is busy enjoying their lunchbreak, a deadlock is taking place amongst the members of the school council. Bitter rivalries, secret alliances and false promises are laid bare. As a ruthless battle ensues, who will win and does anyone really care?

A play about politics, populism and the ‘ping’ of a text message.

SALT

by Dawn King

Life is never plain sailing, but when a new government initiative comes into place offering young people the chance to train and learn skills overseas, droves of teens jump at the chance to secure their future. Once on board the transport ship, the promises of the glossy advert seem a far cry from what lies ahead.

A play about generations, choices and hope.

CHAOS

by Laura Lomas

A girl is locked in a room. A boy brings another boy flowers. A girl has tied herself to a railing. A boy doesn’t know who he is. A girl worries about impending catastrophe. A woman jumps in front of a train. A boy’s heart falls out his chest. A butterfly has a broken wing.

Chaos is a symphony of dislocated and interconnected scenes. A series of characters search for meaning in a complicated and unstable world. Bouncing through physics, the cosmos, love and violence, they find order in the disorder of each other.

FLESH

by Rob Drummond

A group of teenagers wake up in a forest with no clue how they got there. They find themselves separated into two different teams but have no idea what game they are expected to play. With no food, no water and seemingly no chance of escape, it’s only a matter of time before things start to get drastic. But whose side are people on and how far will they go to survive?

This is a play about human nature, the tribes we create and cannibalism.

THE SMALL HOURS

by Katherine Soper

It’s the middle of the night and Peebs and Epi are the only students left at school over half-term. At the end of their night out, former step-siblings Red and Jazz try to navigate their reunion. With only a couple of hours until morning, Jaffa tries to help Keesh finish an essay. As day breaks, Wolfie is getting up the courage to confess a secret to VJ at a party.

Their choices are small yet momentous. The hours are small but feel very, very long. And when the night finally ends, the future is waiting – all of it.

terra / earth

by Nell Leyshon, choreography by Anthony Missen

A group of classmates is torn apart by the opportunity to perform their own dance. As they disagree and bicker, two distinct physical groups emerge and separate into opposing teams.

When a strange outsider appears – out of step with everyone else – the divide is disrupted. A contemporary narrative dance piece about individuality, community and heritage.

AGELESS

by Benjamin Kuffuor

‘Generations to come will view this as the moment that the curse of ageing was removed and the world was able to look to tomorrow without the fear of a failing mind or body.’

In a not too distant future, Temples pharmaceutical corporation has quite literally changed the face of ageing. Their miracle drug keeps its users looking perpetually teenage. With an ever youthful population, how can society support those who are genuinely young?

A play which questions what it means to be young and the ways in which generations collide.

THE SAD CLUB

by Luke Barnes with Music By Adam Pleeth

This is a musical about depression and anxiety. It’s a collection of monologues, songs and duologues from all over time and space exploring what about living in this world stops us from being happy and how we might go about tackling those problems.

The National Theatre’s Partner for Learning is Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Connections is supported by:

Connections is supported by The Mohn Westlake Foundation, The Buffini Chao Foundation, Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation, Delta Air Lines, The Peter Cundill Foundation, Mactaggart Third Fund, The EBM Charitable Trust, Samantha and Richard Campbell-Breeden, Susan Miller and Byron Grote, and The Broughton Family Charitable Trust.

2018 Follies Cast Recording now available at the NT Bookshop

Follies

Following the final performance of Follies in the Olivier on 11 May, the National Theatre announces the CD release of Stephen Sondheim’s legendary musical Follies – 2018 National Theatre Cast Recording this Friday, 17 May.

Following its 2018 Olivier Award wins for Best Musical Revival and Best Costume Design and a sold out run at the National Theatre, this critically acclaimed production of Follies releases its much-anticipated London Cast Recording. Including musical hits such as I’m Still HereBroadway Baby and Losing My Mind.

Follies tells the story of the former performers of Weismann’s Follies, reunited for the first time in their theatre which is to be demolished the next day. Thirty years after their final performance, the Follies girls gather to have a few drinks, sing a few songs and lie about themselves.

Director of Follies and Associate of the National Theatre Dominic Cooke said:

“Directing Follies has been a privilege. It is a heart-breaking, universal piece and the National Theatre committed epic resources to realise it. The original company gave detailed, powerful performances and I’m delighted that we managed to record them for listeners to appreciate Stephen Sondheim’s peerless score, just as I was working with an equally brilliant cast on the Olivier revival.”

FOLLIES – 2018 National Theatre Cast Recording was recorded at RAK Studios in London with world-renowned producer Nigel Wright, conducted by Olivier Nominee Nigel Lilley and mixed by SMP Studios, Buckinghamshire. The soundtrack cast includes Julie Armstrong, Norma Attallah, Josephine Barstow, Jeremy Batt, Tracie Bennett, Di Botcher, Billy Boyle, Janie Dee, Anouska Eaton, Liz Ewing, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Peter Forbes, Emily Goodenough, Bruce Graham, Adrian Grove, Fred Haig, Aimee Hodnett, Dawn Hope, Liz Izen, Alison Langer, Emily Langham, Sarah-Marie Maxwell, Ian McLarnon, Leisha Mollyneux, Gemma Page, Kate Parr, Philip Quast, Edwin Ray, Gary Raymond, Adam Rhys-Charles, Jordan Shaw, Imelda Staunton, Zizi Strallen, Barnaby Thompson, Christine Tucker, Michael Vinsen and Alex Young.

FOLLIES Track Listing

  1. Prologue
  2. Beautiful Girls
  3. Don’t Look At Me
  4. Waiting For The Girls Upstairs
  5. Rain On The Roof / Ah, Paris! / Broadway Baby (Medley)
  6. The Road You Didn’t Take
  7. In Buddy’s Eyes
  8. Who’s That Woman?
  9. I’m Still Here
  10. Too Many Mornings
  11. The Right Girl
  12. One More Kiss
  13. Could I Leave You?
  14. Loveland
  15. You’re Gonna Love Tomorrow / Love Will See Us Through (Medley)
  16. Buddy’s Blues
  17. Losing My Mind
  18. The Story Of Lucy and Jessie
  19. Live, Laugh, Love
  20. End of Show

FOLLIES – 2018 National Theatre Cast Recording is also available across digital download and streaming accounts now. Download and streaming link can be found HERE.

The Lehman Trilogy opens in the West End

National Theatre

Following sold-out runs at the National Theatre and in New York at the Park Avenue Armory, the NT and Neal Street Productions’ critically acclaimed production of The Lehman Trilogy arrives in the West End, opening for a limited 16-week run this Saturday.

The Lehman Trilogy, by Stefano Massini, adapted by Ben Power and directed by Sam Mendes (The Ferryman, Skyfall), plays at the Piccadilly Theatre until Saturday 31 August.

Additional seats are now available to book across the run and a limited number of £25 day seats will be available to purchase for each performance, to be booked in person from 10am each morning at the Piccadilly Theatre Box Office.

The Lehman Trilogy transfers to the West End direct from the production’s triumphant New York debut at the Park Avenue Armory, where it garnered huge critical acclaim. The New York Times called it a ‘magnificent play, a genuinely epic production out of London, directed with surging sweep and fine-tooled precision by Sam Mendes…with a design team that understands the value of simplicity in doing justice to complex matters.’ The production has been nominated for two Drama Desk Awards; Luke Halls for Outstanding Projection Design and Nick Powell for Outstanding Music in a Play, and the Drama League Award for Outstanding Production of a Broadway or off-Broadway play. The winners will be announced later this month.

The story of a family and a company that changed the world, told in three parts on a single evening. The Lehman Trilogy weaves through nearly two centuries of Lehman lineage. On a cold September morning in 1844 a young man from Bavaria stands on a New York dockside. Dreaming of a new life in the new world. He is joined by his two brothers and an American epic begins. 163 years later, the firm they establish – Lehman Brothers – spectacularly collapses into bankruptcy, and triggers the largest financial crisis in history.

Simon Russell BealeAdam Godley and Ben Miles play the Lehman brothers and a cast of characters, including their sons and grandsons, in an extraordinary feat of storytelling, until 3 August. From 5 August, Dominik Tiefenthaler will play the role of Emanuel Lehman alongside Simon Russell Beale and Adam Godley.

The Lehman Trilogy features Olivier Award-nominated set designs by Es Devlin, costume design by Katrina Lindsay, video design by Luke Halls, and lighting design by Jon Clark. The Composer & Sound Designer is Nick Powell, the Co-Sound Designer isDominic Bilkey, with music direction by Candida Caldicot, movement by Polly Bennett and voice by Charmian Hoare. The Associate Director is Zoé Ford Burnett.

A talk, Simon Russell Beale, Adam Godley and Ben Miles on The Lehman Trilogy, will take place on stage at the Piccadilly Theatre on Friday 7 June at 3pm. The actors reflect on the challenges and rewards of performing in The Lehman Trilogy, from originating the roles at the National Theatre in 2018, through taking the show to New York and now performing in the West End. This talk will include an audience Q&A session.

The world premiere of Stefano Massini’s The Lehman Trilogy opened at the Piccolo Teatro in Milan in 2015. It turned out to be Artistic Director Luca Ronconi’s final production before his death. A long-term admirer of Ronconi’s, Sam Mendes was inspired to begin planning an English adaptation for Neal Street Productions. Ben Power was commissioned to create a new version of this epic play, using a literal English translation by Mirella Cheeseman.

The Lehman Trilogy is produced in the West End by the National Theatre and Neal Street Productions.

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National Theatre announces new exhibition RONAN MCKENZIE: PHOTOGRAPHS

Ronan McKenzie: Photographs

Inspired by Andrea Levy’s Small Island and Helen Edmundson’s adaption for the National Theatre, photographer Ronan McKenziehas been commissioned by the National Theatre to respond to the post war journeys undertaken by Caribbean men and women between 1948 -1971. Photographed in Leigh-on-Sea on the shores of the Thames estuary, McKenzie’s documentary style images subtly connect ideas of seascapes, water, arrivals and new beginnings to Levy’s Small Island.

Ronan McKenzie said: “For me this series represents the multiplicity and diversity in experiences of Caribbean immigrants, that begun in 1948 with the arrival of the Empire Windrush. Both being islands, The Caribbean and United Kingdom are linked by water, which inspired the artistic direction for the series. Similarly, immigration and personal journeys are sentiments that many people can relate to on a number of levels, and the clusters of people within my images aim to depict the connection between many of these stories.”

Curated by Natasha Bonnelame, the exhibition takes water as a central theme reflected not only in terms of the location but also in the colour of the textiles and the intricate finger waves of the hairstyles. Beautifully crafted shots of individuals are grouped with images of the collective, an important and significant detail in the development of the African Caribbean experience in the UK. The subjects in the photographs are all theatre makers living in or around London today.

Natasha Bonnelame said: “The majority of Windrush images are of young men, but women were there too. They were defiant and purposeful. We see this in Andrea Levy’s Small Island and Ronan McKenzie’s considered and arresting images centre the women in the collective. This is both important and necessary.”

Related Talks and Events

Caribbean Women’s Diaspora: Calling the West Indies Sat 18 May 2019, 2pm

The Stuart Hall Project (film screening) Mon 20 May 2019, 6.30pm

A New Beacon: Caribbean Artists Movement Thu 23 May 2019, 6.30pm

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Casting for ANNA announced

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Bill Deamer: ‘We are not doing a carbon copy; that was that production of Follies and this is a new production of Follies.’

Follies

Choreographer Bill Deamer enters the room. ‘Hello!’ he says cheerily.

Bill Deamer is one of Britain’s leading song and dance men for theatre, film and TV. Last year he bagged himself an Olivier nomination for Best Theatre Choreographer for Follies

Now Dominic Cooke’s production of Stephen Sondheim and James Goldman’s masterpiece, is back at the National Theatre. We are talking in the interview room backstage at the National Theatre and Deamer has just been giving notes to the cast of Follies. ‘We now have to let them take the show and run with it,’ he says.

The 2019 Follies Company with Bill Deamer

The 2019 Follies Company with Bill Deamer

It’s tricky, Deamer explains, to reimagine a critically acclaimed musical for the Olivier stage with new cast members in just over a month, yet they have cleared that obstacle with breath-taking ease. ‘We’ve only had four weeks rehearsal whereas we had 9 originally. What you can’t do when you recast is assume the energy is going to be the same.’

It’s not only the cast that has changed since the 2017 production, however. The ensemble brings glorious new touches to the big number choreography; particularly the Mirror Mirror number, in which Dawn Hope leads the cast through a show-stopping musical theatre extravaganza.

FOLLIES 2.0

FOLLIES 2.0

Rehearsals must have been full-on? ‘To learn and create and become the Follies company in four weeks was a tall order, Deamer says. ‘The actors are different, we are not doing a carbon copy; that was that production of Follies and this is a new production of Follies. We’ve looked at certain concepts and developed them even more. The ghosts and how they are in contact with and interact with their older selves have all been developed.’

‘There’s a moment at the beginning of the show, during the Overture and all of a sudden the ghosts realise that they are back and they all gesture to the front,’ he continues. ‘There’s so much power in it, it gives me Gooseflesh talking about it.’

During a recent preview an audience member took a photograph of Joanna Riding performing as her voice cracked during the last lines of Losing My Mind. Follies’ Associate Director, Josh Seymour tweeted his dismay.

He winces when I mention it. ‘Good job Imelda wasn’t there!’ he says. ‘I can’t believe that during one of the most sensitive parts of the show somebody actually pulls a camera out to take a photograph – with a flash on. It’s absurd. Why do people do it? It’s so rude – it is disrespectful to the actors and it disrespectful to the audience.’

Should they have been ejected? ‘Yes.’ Deamer says bemused.

Were they? ‘No. It was such a subtle part of the show it would have disturbed things more to chuck them out,’ he says.

‘I think we all talk about audience etiquette and audience behaviour but it is not made clear enough – when you are recording for TV you hand your phones in. Maybe that is the way to go? I just don’t know.’

We discuss the mythical Follies 2018 Cast Recording that has just finally been released. ‘I’ve heard all of the various productions of Follies that have been recorded and they all have their merits. I think the quality of all of the vocals are quite extraordinary – Stephen Sondheim’s music and Jonathan Tunick’s arrangement just come to life.’

Alexander Hanson and Joanna Riding credit: Johan-Persson

Alexander Hanson and Joanna Riding credit: Johan-Persson

Does he have a favourite? ‘I have to say that Too Many Mornings breaks my heart; the woodwind, the obo – that wonderful sound. There is something in it that just moves me completely. Hearing Phillip (Quast) and Imelda (Staunton) sing it together is quite extraordinary,’ Deamer says.

The ghosts of those former cast certainly loom over the return of Follies; there are some big tap-shoes to fill. Now though, replacing Staunton as Sally is Joanna Riding and Alexander Hanson takes on the role of Ben. ‘Joanna and Alex are so completely different from their predecessors,’ Deamer says.

‘Jo is so different from Imelda – you couldn’t say that one is better than another; they are completely different. Alex brings such pathos to Ben. I have my amazing memories of working with Imelda and Phillip and now I have my memories of working with Jo and Alex.’

Dawn Hope Stella and the company National Theatre credit: Johan Persson

Dawn Hope Stella and the company National Theatre credit: Johan Persson

‘They are quite wonderful because Dominic and I have worked hard with them and it is all based as it was originally: the director, the designer, the choreographer and the music, we all work as one. So, we had that strength in the rehearsal room.’

Deamer has been a consistently working choreographer for over twenty-five years. His first Olivier nomination was for the critically acclaimed production of The Boy Friend that opened at Regents Park Open Air Theatre in 2006. He has beavered away across theatre, film and television winning an Olivier Award as Best Choreographer in 2013 for Top Hat, as a musical theatre and Charleston specialist for Strictly Come Dancing.

Bill Deamer and Carl Woodward

Bill Deamer and Carl Woodward

He never stops.

The last thing Deamer wants is to be thought of as, he stresses, a one-style  choreographer. ‘People assume I just do the old-fashioned stuff- which drives me insane. Actually, it is not old fashioned, it is classic. I’ve got Saturday Night Fever out on tour at the moment. I have a production of Evita that’s toured for 11 years around Europe out on the road.’

‘I’m a fully trained dancer and a musical theatre choreographer,’ he shrugs. ‘I trained in classical dance and ballet and jazz and indeed if anyone knows my work on TV with Strictly. For me, pigeonholing any artist is just nonsense.’

Dominic Cooke (Director) and Bill Deamer (Choreographer) in rehearsal for Follies at

Dominic Cooke (Director) and Bill Deamer (Choreographer) in rehearsal for Follies 

What advice does he have for aspiring choreographers? ‘The first thing that I say to any performer is: learn your craft. Get your technique – without that you will not survive. Too many dancers are jack of all trades and master of none and quite simply, it isn’t going to work.’

Our time has come to an end and it’s time for Bill to go.

‘I’m very luck to do what I do – I have worked for it and I’ve learnt my trade. It is wonderful to work with such brilliantly diverse people and create theatre – it feels like such a privilege to be able to work on the various projects that I do; when it doesn’t, I won’t do it,’ he concludes. The words are spoken without a hint of mawkishness, only sincerity. It is all he knows.

Follies is at the Oliver, London until 11 May.

The National Theatre to tour Shelagh Delaney’s A Taste of Honey around the UK

National Theatre
  • A Taste Of Honey is directed by Bijan Sheibani and designed by Hildegard Bechtler
  • Jodie Prenger will play Helen
  • A Taste Of Honey will tour to nine venues from September, opening at the Lowry, Salford

The National Theatre today announced a UK tour of Bijan Sheibani’s production of A Taste of HoneyShelagh Delaney’s remarkable taboo-breaking 1950s play, which was first produced in the Lyttelton Theatre in 2014, designed by Hildegard Bechtler and reconceived in an exciting new production, featuring a live on stage band, for the tour.

Jodie Prenger (Oliver!One Man, Two GuvnorsAbigail’s Party UK tour) plays Helen, with further casting to be announced.

Written by Shelagh Delaney when she was nineteen, A Taste of Honey offers an explosive celebration of the vulnerabilities and strengths of the female spirit in a deprived and restless world.

When her mother Helen runs off with a car salesman, feisty teenager Jo takes up with Jimmy, a sailor who promises to marry her, before he heads for the seas leaving her pregnant and alone.  Art student Geoff moves in and assumes the role of surrogate parent until, misguidedly, he sends for Helen and their unconventional setup unravels.

An exhilarating depiction of working-class life in post-war SalfordA Taste of Honey will open there at The Lowry from 13 – 21 September, with a press night on Friday 20 September.

The tour will also visit the Kings Theatre, Edinburgh (24 – 28 September); the Marlowe Theatre, Canterbury (1 – 5 October); Richmond Theatre (7 – 12 October); Grand Opera House, Belfast (15 – 19 October); Leicester Curve (22 – 26 October); Theatre Royal, Bath (28 October – 2 November); Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton (5 – 9 November); and the Norwich Theatre Royal (12 – 16 November). Tickets will go on sale in venues from mid-February, check theatre websites for specific details.

The sound designer will be Ian Dickinson for Autograph, the composer will be Paul Englishby, the movement director will be Aline David.

Shelagh Delaney wrote her first play, A Taste of Honey in ten days after seeing Rattigan’s Variation of a Theme in Manchester. She sent the script to Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop and the play opened at the Theatre Royal, Stratford East in 1958 before transferring to the West End. It was later made into a feature film with Rita Tushingham, Dora Bryan and Murray Melvin and the Broadway transfer featured Joan Plowright and Angela Landsury. Delaney’s other work includes The Lion in Love. For television she wrote The House That Jack Built and was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Bijan Sheibani is an award winning theatre and opera director. His work for the National Theatre includes Barber Shop ChroniclesA Taste of HoneyEmil and the DetectivesThe Kitchen, and Our Class (Olivier Nomination for Best Director). Other theatre includes Dance Nation and The House of Bernarda Alba (Almeida Theatre); Circle Mirror Transformation (Home, Manchester); The Brothers Size (Young Vic, Olivier Nomination);Giving (Hampstead Theatre); Moonlight (Donmar Warehouse); Gone Too Far (Royal Court Theatre, Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in an Affiliate Theatre). He was artistic director of Actors Touring Company from 2007 to 2010, and an associate director at the National Theatre from 2010 to 2015.

Jodie Prenger’s work for the NT includes One Man, Two Guvnors for the NT in the West End; Nancy in Oliver! (Theatre Royal, Drury Lane); Lady of the Lake in Spamalot (Playhouse Theatre and UK Tour); Calamity Jane in Calamity Jane (UK Tour); Tell Me on a Sunday (UK Tour); Miss Hannigan in Annie (New Theatre, Oxford); Shirley in Shirley Valentine (UK Tour); Kelly in Fat Friends The Musical (UK Tour) and Beverly in Abigail’s Party (UK tour). Television includes Years and Years, Citizen KhanWizards vs AliensCandy Cabs and Waterloo Road. She won the Theatregoers’ Choice Whats On Stage Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Musical.

Hildegard Bechtler is an Olivier Award-winning theatre and opera designer whose designs for the NT include ConsentSunset at the Villa ThaliaWasteA Taste of HoneyScenes from an ExecutionAfter the DanceHarper ReganThe Hour We Knew Nothing of Each OtherThe HothouseThérèse RaquinExilesPrimoIphigenia at AulisThe Merchant of VeniceRichard II, and King Lear. For the RSC she has designed The Crucible and Electra. In London’s West End her designs include Oresteia (also Almeida Theatre), Top HatPassion PlayOld TimesThe Sunshine BoysArcadiaThe Lady from DubuqueBy the Bog of CatsThe Master BuilderFootfallsHedda GablerThe MisanthropeThe Goat or Who is Sylvia?The Crucible. On Broadway she has designed PrimoArcadia, and The Seagull.

A Taste of Honey is produced on tour by the National Theatre.

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First Look: Rehearsal images released for Follies