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Taiwan Season 2019 at Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Taiwan Season 2019

For the sixth year in a row the world’s biggest arts festival features a showcase of dance and theatre direct from Taiwan.

Since its inception the Taiwan Season has gone from strength to strength. In 2019 it proudly returns to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe for a sixth consecutive year with some of the best live performances being made on the island today. Drawn from an open call to practitioners of all art forms in Taiwan, and carefully curated by the key Fringe venues Dance Base and Summerhall, the season puts a spotlight on dance and theatre via a diverse quartet of uniquely entertaining productions:

*Taiwan’s award-winning Chang Dance Theatre – co-creators of 2018 Fringe hit Bon 4 Bon – return with Bout (Summerhall, July 31-Aug 25), a dance trio revealing fresh facets of fraternal conflict and bonding.

*BSL-sign language meets puppetry in Shinehouse Theatre’s Fish (Summerhall, July 31-Aug 25), anengaging, sensory piece of theatre that casts a warm light on generational differences.

*Inspired by one of Taiwan’s most beautiful Buddhist ceremonies, Floating Flowers (Dance Base, Aug 2-25) is a fabulously dynamic expression of body and spirit from Po-Cheng Tsai’s company B.Dance.

*Described by choreographer Yen-Cheng Liu as ‘a psychedelic fantasy,’ Dua Shin Te Production’sMonster (Dance Base, Aug 2-25) is a daring, intense and mind-blowing performance that questions one’s sense of self.

[Please note: No shows Monday Aug 5, 12 and 19 and, additionally, none for Monster Thursday Aug 8, 15 and 22.]

Produced and managed collaboratively by Zhong He Creative International Co., Ltd., Taiwan and Step Out Arts, UK and funded by Taiwan’s Ministry of Culture, Taiwan Season 2019 warmly invites audiences to experience a range of ideas, emotions and flavours in a hand-picked sampling of some of the most stimulating contemporary performances from Taiwan.

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Ridiculusmus’ new show Die! Die! Die! Old People Die!

Ridiculusmus brings its latest show to the 2019 Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! 

a funny and fragile farce about ageing, dying and mourning

TechCube0, Summerhall
Tuesday 13 to Sunday 25 August at 5.40pm
Press performance: Wednesday 14 August at 5.40pm

The UK’s most enduring theatre double act Ridiculusmus bring their latest show Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from Tuesday 13 to Saturday 25 August. Die! Die! Die! is the final part of a trilogy of works transforming mental health issues into witty and accessible theatre which will be performed in full on 25 August.

In an age where death and grieving are being medicalised out of existence, Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! strives to reclaim humankind’s last taboo from eradication in a paper-fine portrait of a love triangle cursed to eternal life, but without eternal youth.

Libidinous centenarians Violet, Norman and Arthur are doomed to enact a slo-mo ballet of sadness. Amid fumbling, daily rounds of coffee, call centres and cat food, their rants, dribbles, pills and cough bombs litter an ambling blend of symbolist mysticism and synesthesia that has the fear of an ageing world population in its sights. It oozes with the relentless positivity of elderhood and good deaths.

For Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! Haynes and Woods shadowed palliative care workers, liaised with the Festival of Death and Dying in Melbourne, attended death cafés where people talk about death over tea and cake, and trawled their own grief memories for material. Woods began a course as a bereavement counselor – but had to pull out when his own father died.
Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! is the final part of Ridiculusmus’ trilogy of works transforming complex mental health issues into witty and accessible theatre. The full trilogy, Dialogue as the Embodiment of Love, will be presented on Sunday 25 August. Big pharma, psychiatry, psychology and the system all collide in the first two plays – domestic encounters that plunge audiences into disorders of the everyday. The Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland is informed by a treatment method for psychosis which delivered incredible results whilst Give Me Your Love explores the therapeutic impact of MDMA on post-traumatic stress disorder.

www.ridiculusmus.com
Twitter @_Ridiculusmus_

Listings
Company: Ridiculusmus
Show: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die!
Venue: TechCube 0, Summerhall, 1 Summerhall, Edinburgh EH9 1PL
Dates: Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 August (previews); Thursday 15 to Sunday 25 August (no performance on Monday 19 August)
Tickets: 13 & 14 August £8; 15 to 18 August, 20 to 25 August £10 (£8 concessions)
Time: 5.40pm
Box office: 0131 560 1581 / www.summerhall.co.uk
Running time: approx. 60 minutes
Suggested age range: 13+
Show: Dialogue as the Embodiment of Love – the trilogy
Date: Sunday 25 August
Times: 4.05pm: Give Me Your Love; 5.40pm: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die!; 8.55pm: Eradication of Schizophrenia in Western Lapland

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Here’s Your Definitive Guide to Edinburgh Fringe 2019 (you’re welcome)

Edinburgh Fringe 2019 guide by Mr Carl Woodward
Bryony Kimmings

Bryony Kimmings

I loved Bryony Kimming’s I’m A Phoenix, Bitch at Battersea Arts Centre – don’t miss it at The Pleasance. You really are in safe hands with ThisEgg; a gorgeous four-women show called dressed returnsRhum and Clay’s clever The War of the Worlds will be sure to make its mark, too. 

Elsewhere, YESYESNONO return with The Accident Did Not Take Place, featuring a new guest performer every night. Could be good. Dark Lady Co are staging Drowning at Pleasance Courtyard as well – it sets out to confront all we deem evil, horrible, and hideous. Curious eh.

Over at Summerhall, double act Ridiculusmus bring a smart show: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! This is funny and fragile farce about mortality and mourning. The highly brilliant Cardboard Citizens return with Bystanders, shining a light on the life and death of homeless people. National Theatre Wales will chart the story of a woman travelling from Ireland to Wales to have an abortion in Cotton FingersKieran Hurley and Gary McNair’s Square Go return as well and that will be worth seeing. 

Paines Plough are kind of amazing aren’t they. They always put on outstanding new plays from around the UK; this year it is no different: there are three world premieres in The Roundabout @ Summerhall in co-production with Theatr Clwyd by Daf JamesNathan Bryon and Charles Miles

Among other highlights, Steph Martin stars in I’m Non Typical,Typical by Cambridge’s Bedazzle Inclusive Theatre; this new play aims to change people’s perceptions of disability. Worth a look. 

(BalletBoyz) Dancers in cube

(BalletBoyz) Dancers in cube

Edinburgh Fringe demigod Henry Naylor brings The Nights – the fifth stand-alone play in Naylor’s Arabian Nightmares series, that tackles the uncomfortable relationship between the East and West, post 9/11/ (his wife is Sarah Kendall, you know). I’m rather excited about all-male company BalletyBoyz making their dreamy fringe debut, with THEM/US one piece choreographed by the company and the other by Christopher Wheeldon at Bristo Square, Underbelly. Unmissable talent.  

Traverse Theatre features a host of world premieres including Crocodile Fever by Meghan Tyler – a blackly comic drama set in Northern Ireland. Javaad Alipoor will direct his piece created with the excellent Kirsty HouselyRich Kids: A History of Shopping Malls in Tehran – inspired by stories of the expanding global wealth division. 

I’m also curious to see what the Edinburgh International Festival has on offer. Stephen Fry will present a trilogy of plays adapted from his book Mythos, about the Greek pantheon of gods and their various inceptions. Disability-led Birds of Paradise present Robert Softley Gale’s Purposeless Movements, exploring the perception of masculinity and disability. 

Sometimes you can find a hidden gem at theSpaceUK. I must emphasise the choice word ‘sometimes’ here. (I once sat in a basement with a pipe leaking on my head for 50 minutes, while a woman shaved her legs to the songs of Thin Lizzy – it was not good. It was, in fact, shit). 

Noir Hamlet

Noir Hamlet

Anyway, if you like comedy I reckon Noir Hamlet, which has already picked up the Boston Globe Critic’s Pick earlier this year – is worth a look; it updates Hamlet to a wise-cracking 1940s detective up to his neck in a comedic case with more twists that a gallows tie. 

While you are there, Level Up might be worth a look. It explores a near-future utopia where real love is impossible to measure.

National Theatre of Scotland are staging two world premieres at the festival – Jackie Kay’s Red Dust Road, about growing up as a mixed-race adopted Scot, as well as Tim Crouch’s Total Immediate Collective Imminent Terrestrial Salvation, in a co-production with the Royal Court.

Ian McKellen

Ian McKellen

Stop the clocks: Ian McKellen stops off as part of his 80 date UK tour: this is sold out, which is a shame. I should mention that Robert Icke brings his political reimagining of Oedipus to the international festival, I don’t think I have the energy for this, though.
So, there you have it, that’s the end of my definitive Edinburgh Fringe 2019 guide.

I hope you have found some use in this guide to what the fringe world has on offer. 

If you have tips, tweet me: @mrcarlwoodward*thumbs up emoji*.

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Mamoru Iriguchi ( 4D Cinema ) : ‘By having a screen around your face, you can make sure that everybody enjoys both the video and your face’

Mamoru Iriguchi

Mamoru Iriguchi

Mamoru Iriguchi is at Summerhall with 4D Cinema. I caught up with him and chatted about the challenges of being a performer at Edinburgh, technical difficulties and more.

Hi ya! Where are you and what are you doing currently?
In my flat (I live in Edinburgh) and drinking coffee. If this question is about my work, I am a theatre designer and performance maker.

How have audiences responded to 4D Cinema so far?
Very positively, I think.

In your show 4D Cinema – you sport a screen and a projector around your face – Where did the idea come from?
When you use video projection in your show, often the audience members only watch the projection and forget about your presence. By having a screen around your face, you can make sure that everybody enjoys both the video and your face.
4D Cinema is partly about the differences between live and filmed performances, so I wanted to place the two very closely.

What’s the hardest part about being a Fringe performer?
I think the hardest part would be sharing a bedroom with ten other performers. Luckily I am based in Edinburgh, so I do not have that. I wish I had more money to see more shows but this is probably a universal issue for everyone who works in art.

Do you read reviews of your work?
Yes, I cry with joy or despair while reading them.

How do you warm up physically, mentally and vocally for this show?
I cycle (uphill) to the venue everyday. I often take a cycle path around Arthur’s Seat and sing a song or two. I am ready when I get there.

Summerhall is quite remarkable isn’t it?
Yes there are lots of really great shows.

Have you been down the Royal Mile in your garb? It would be quite something.
I am afraid not, because, sadly, my projector is not battery-operated.

Have you had any technical difficulties?
Nothing other than my own clumsiness.

Anything you’d like to add? 
Please come to see 4D Cinema.

Solo tour-de-force Scorch puts gender identity centre stage at Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Scorch is presented by Primecut Productions at Paines Plough’s Roundabout at Summerhall and sees the Fringe debut for award-winning Northern Irish playwright Stacey Gregg. Directed by Emma Jordan (Paul Hamlyn Cultural Entrepreneurship Breakthrough Award) and performed by Amy McAllister (Call the MidwifePhilomena) the production showcases the work of three of the most exciting voices in Northern Irish theatre today. The play is a new original work from Belfast playwright Stacey Gregg and explores issues surrounding gender disclosure experienced by a contemporary teenager.

Scorch

Scorch

Scorch gained further international recognition after it won the Irish Times theatre award for Best New Play of 2015 and has recently won Best New Play at the Writer’s Guild of Ireland ZeBBie Awards.

Inspired by recent court cases and set in the round, Amy McAllister plays Kes, a troubled teenage girl struggling with her gender identity. Kes explores her sexuality and gender by posing as a boy who embarks on an intimate relationship with another girl, which leads to devastating effects both legally and personally. At times funny, poignant and explosive, Scorch is a story of first love through the eyes of a gender-curious teen and examines how the human story often gets lost amidst the headlines.
Presented by Prime Cut Productions; Scorch is directed by Emma Jordan, produced by Una NicEoin and written by Stacey Gregg. Featuring Design/LX by Ciaran Bagnall, Sound Design by Carl Kennedy and Costume Design by Enda Kenny. The production and associated outreach activity is made possible through funding provided by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Belfast City Council and Paul Hamlyn Foundation.
2016 marks the third year of Roundabout, Paines Plough’s award-winning portable in-the-round auditorium. It will take up residency once again at Summerhall during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from 4 – 29 August.

The real life issue takes on heightened dramatic resonance, fractured and splintered by Gregg’s syncopated prose style”

★★★★ Irish Times

McAllister deftly deals with the emotions involved: incredulity, sadness, fear and the lingering confusion”

★★★★ GiggingNI

Listings Information:

Scorch

Venue: Paines Plough’s Roundabout at Summerhall

Dates & Times: 18.05 (55 mins)5 – 28 August (not Tuesdays 9, 16, 23)

Tickets: Previews 5,6,7, August: £9

10, 11, 15, 17, 18, 22, 24, 25, 29 August: £14 (full) £12 (conc)
8, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 August: £16 (full) £14 (conc)
Box Office: 0131 226 000 / 0131 560 1581 tickets.edfringe.com or summerhall.co.uk

Prime Cut Productions Theatre CompanyBased in Belfast, Northern Ireland and formed in 1992, Prime Cut Productions is at the forefront of contemporary international theatre across the island of Ireland. With over 30 Irish and Northern Irish premieres to their name, Prime Cut have a reputation for producing award-winning, critically acclaimed professional theatre, that challenges, provokes, inspires, entertains and enthrals.

About Paines Plough. Plough is the UK’s national theatre of new plays. The company commissions and produces the best playwrights and tours their plays far and wide. Whether you’re in Liverpool or Lyme Regis, Scarborough or Southampton, a Paines Plough show is coming to a theatre near you soon.
Paines Plough was formed in 1974 over a pint of Paines bitter in the Plough pub. Since then they’ve produced more than 130 new productions by world renowned playwrights like Stephen Jeffreys, Abi Morgan, Sarah Kane, Mark Ravenhill, Dennis Kelly and Mike Bartlett.
2016 marks the third year of Roundabout, Paines Plough’s award-winning portable in-the-round auditorium. The Roundabout season will preview from 19 – 24 July at Hackney Showroom in London before taking up residency once again at Summerhall during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from 4 – 29 August