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Join me for a Zoom based Theatre Quiz – Friday

Theatre Quiz with Carl Woodward

My Zoom Theatre quiz is back!

There are ten slots, and anyone can apply so as well as playing a fun quiz I end up speaking to 10 different theatre people  — from broadway stars to theatre lovers, to journalists, to ushers.

It is nuts.

Anyway, every Friday at 8.30pm during lockdown I am going to host this Zoom Theatre Quiz.

If you would like to join this week then email me everything that you think I need to know about yourself as well as your least favourite character in The Sound of Music.

E: MRCARLWOODWARD@GMAIL.COM

Application deadline is Thursday 7 May at 6.00pm and spaces are limited. If you’re selected to be play i’ll be in touch.

NOTES:

— There is a prize

– You need to be over 18, or literally 18.

– Please do not bring any animals unless this has been explicitly requested.

– Due to the likelihood of contestant duties inducing strong feelings of euphoria I do not recommend participating on an empty stomach.

Cheers!

WHO WANTS TO DO A THEATRE QUIZ (again)

Theatre Quiz with Carl Woodward

How To Take Part

LAST WEEK I HOSTED MY FIRST IN A SERIES OF THEATRE QUIZZES – IT WENT QUITE WELL.

ANYWAY, THE NEXT QUIZ WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE EVENING OF APRIL 24 (IT’S A FRIDAY) ON ZOOM.

IF YOU’D LIKE TO JOIN IN ON THE NIGHT, EMAIL MRCARLWOODWARD@GMAIL.COM

TELL ME EVERYTHING YOU THINK I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOURSELF.

ALSO NAME ME THREE MUSICALS BETTER THAN WEST SIDE STORY

If you’re selected to be play i’ll be in touch.

 

NOTES:

— There is a prize

– You need to be over 18, or literally 18.

– Please do not bring any animals unless this has been explicitly requested.

– Due to the likelihood of contestant duties inducing strong feelings of euphoria I do recommend not participating on an empty stomach

WHO WANTS TO DO A THEATRE QUIZ

Carl Woodward

How To Take Part

QUIZ WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE EVENING OF APRIL 17  (IT’S A FRIDAY) ON ZOOM.

IF YOU’D LIKE TO JOIN IN ON THE NIGHT, EMAIL MRCARLWOODWARD@GMAIL.COM

TELL ME EVERYTHING YOU THINK I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT YOURSELF.

PLEASE ALSO NAME ONE MUSICAL THAT SHOULD NOT EXIST.

If you’re selected to be play i’ll be in touch.

 

NOTES:

— There is a prize

– You need to be over 18, or literally 18.

– Please do not bring any animals unless this has been explicitly requested.

– Due to the likelihood of contestant duties inducing strong feelings of euphoria I do not recommend participating on an empty stomach.

 

 

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Here’s Your Definitive Guide to Edinburgh Fringe 2019 (you’re welcome)

Edinburgh Fringe 2019 guide by Mr Carl Woodward
Bryony Kimmings

Bryony Kimmings

I loved Bryony Kimming’s I’m A Phoenix, Bitch at Battersea Arts Centre – don’t miss it at The Pleasance. You really are in safe hands with ThisEgg; a gorgeous four-women show called dressed returnsRhum and Clay’s clever The War of the Worlds will be sure to make its mark, too. 

Elsewhere, YESYESNONO return with The Accident Did Not Take Place, featuring a new guest performer every night. Could be good. Dark Lady Co are staging Drowning at Pleasance Courtyard as well – it sets out to confront all we deem evil, horrible, and hideous. Curious eh.

Over at Summerhall, double act Ridiculusmus bring a smart show: Die! Die! Die! Old People Die! This is funny and fragile farce about mortality and mourning. The highly brilliant Cardboard Citizens return with Bystanders, shining a light on the life and death of homeless people. National Theatre Wales will chart the story of a woman travelling from Ireland to Wales to have an abortion in Cotton FingersKieran Hurley and Gary McNair’s Square Go return as well and that will be worth seeing. 

Paines Plough are kind of amazing aren’t they. They always put on outstanding new plays from around the UK; this year it is no different: there are three world premieres in The Roundabout @ Summerhall in co-production with Theatr Clwyd by Daf JamesNathan Bryon and Charles Miles

Among other highlights, Steph Martin stars in I’m Non Typical,Typical by Cambridge’s Bedazzle Inclusive Theatre; this new play aims to change people’s perceptions of disability. Worth a look. 

(BalletBoyz) Dancers in cube

(BalletBoyz) Dancers in cube

Edinburgh Fringe demigod Henry Naylor brings The Nights – the fifth stand-alone play in Naylor’s Arabian Nightmares series, that tackles the uncomfortable relationship between the East and West, post 9/11/ (his wife is Sarah Kendall, you know). I’m rather excited about all-male company BalletyBoyz making their dreamy fringe debut, with THEM/US one piece choreographed by the company and the other by Christopher Wheeldon at Bristo Square, Underbelly. Unmissable talent.  

Traverse Theatre features a host of world premieres including Crocodile Fever by Meghan Tyler – a blackly comic drama set in Northern Ireland. Javaad Alipoor will direct his piece created with the excellent Kirsty HouselyRich Kids: A History of Shopping Malls in Tehran – inspired by stories of the expanding global wealth division. 

I’m also curious to see what the Edinburgh International Festival has on offer. Stephen Fry will present a trilogy of plays adapted from his book Mythos, about the Greek pantheon of gods and their various inceptions. Disability-led Birds of Paradise present Robert Softley Gale’s Purposeless Movements, exploring the perception of masculinity and disability. 

Sometimes you can find a hidden gem at theSpaceUK. I must emphasise the choice word ‘sometimes’ here. (I once sat in a basement with a pipe leaking on my head for 50 minutes, while a woman shaved her legs to the songs of Thin Lizzy – it was not good. It was, in fact, shit). 

Noir Hamlet

Noir Hamlet

Anyway, if you like comedy I reckon Noir Hamlet, which has already picked up the Boston Globe Critic’s Pick earlier this year – is worth a look; it updates Hamlet to a wise-cracking 1940s detective up to his neck in a comedic case with more twists that a gallows tie. 

While you are there, Level Up might be worth a look. It explores a near-future utopia where real love is impossible to measure.

National Theatre of Scotland are staging two world premieres at the festival – Jackie Kay’s Red Dust Road, about growing up as a mixed-race adopted Scot, as well as Tim Crouch’s Total Immediate Collective Imminent Terrestrial Salvation, in a co-production with the Royal Court.

Ian McKellen

Ian McKellen

Stop the clocks: Ian McKellen stops off as part of his 80 date UK tour: this is sold out, which is a shame. I should mention that Robert Icke brings his political reimagining of Oedipus to the international festival, I don’t think I have the energy for this, though.
So, there you have it, that’s the end of my definitive Edinburgh Fringe 2019 guide.

I hope you have found some use in this guide to what the fringe world has on offer. 

If you have tips, tweet me: @mrcarlwoodward*thumbs up emoji*.

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The Olivier Awards 2019: Who I Want To Win and Who Will Win

SO, musicals Company and Come from Away lead the 2019 Olivier Award nominations, both receiving nine nominations, which is absolutely ideal. 

If you haven’t seen Marianne Elliott’s gender-switched revival of Company or the exuberant 9/11 musical Come From Away yet – please do because I no longer wish to speak to anyone who hasn’t watched them at least once. 

Company

Company

It’s another storming year for Sonia Friedman, who has received a total of fifteen nominations across three productions for Summer & SmokeAll About Eve The InheritanceMatthew Lopez’s The Inheritance nabbed eight of those nominations.

The expression theatrical gold doesn’t begin to do justice to Lopez’s 2-part, seven-hour play about young gay New Yorkers. It’s a genuine masterpiece that deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as The Ferryman or Chimerica

The Inheritance 

The Inheritance

Rather surprisingly, four productions from Daniel Evans’ inaugural season as artistic director at Chichester Festival Theatre (King Lear ft. Sir Ian McKellenQuiz byJames GrahamCaroline, Or Change starring Sharon D. Clarke & Pressure by David Haig) have received eight nominations between them. (these shows had west end transfer written all over them). 

Other talking points are the hit show Six, a sassy new musical based on Henry VIII’s wives, receiving five nominations. This includes a joint nomination for all six of the queens in a best actress in a supporting role in a musical category. 

SIX 

SIX

Look, I am a sucker for the plucky underdog but let’s not kid ourselves here.

I’m delighted that Young Vic’s musical based on Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel Fun Home has been recognised but furious that Jenna Russell has been snubbed.

Fortunately, stars of stage and screen will light up the Royal Albert Hall as Vanessa Redgrave, Ian McKellen, Eileen Atkins, Gillian Anderson and David Suchet are among those nominated.

Anyway, from the nominees I have picked my deserving winners, and I’ve also taken a guess at who might actually win.

Note: Only Fools and Horses: The Musical & Heathers were overlooked.

FULL LIST OF NOMINATIONS FOR OLIVIER AWARDS 2019 WITH MASTERCARD

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL

Jonathan Bailey for Company at Gielgud Theatre

Clive Carter for Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Richard Fleeshman for Company at Gielgud Theatre

Robert Hands for Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Who I want to win: Jonathan Bailey

Who I think will win: Jonathan Bailey

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL

Patti LuPone for Company at Gielgud Theatre

Ruthie Ann Miles for The King And I at The London Palladium

“The Queens” – Aimie Atkinson, Alexia McIntosh, Millie O’Connell, Natalie Paris, Maiya Quansah-Breed and Jarneia Richard-Noel – for Six at Arts Theatre

Rachel Tucker for Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Who I want to win: Rachel Tucker 

Who I think will win: Patti LuPone (don’t @ me)

 

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC

Come From Away – Book, Music and Lyrics: David Hein and Irene Sankoff; Music Supervisor, Arrangements: Ian Eisendrath; Orchestrations: August Eriksmoen; Musical Director/UK Music Supervisor: Alan Berry; and the band of Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Fun Home – Composer: Jeanine Tesori; Lyricist/Bookwriter: Lisa Kron at Young Vic

The Inheritance – Composer: Paul Englishby at Young Vic and Noël Coward Theatre

A Monster Calls – Original music composed by Benji Bower and performed live by Benji with Will Bower (The Bower Brothers) at The Old Vic

Six – Original score, orchestrations and vocal arrangements: Toby Marlow, Lucy Moss, Tom Curran and Joe Beighton at Arts Theatre

Who I want to win: Fun Home 

Who I think will win: The Inheritance

 

BEST THEATRE CHOREOGRAPHER

Kelly Devine for Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Christopher Gattelli based on original choreography by Jerome Robbins for The King And I at The London Palladium

Carrie-Anne Ingrouille for Six at Arts Theatre

Liam Steel for Company at Gielgud Theatre

Who I want to win: Kelly Devine for Come From Away 

Who I think will win: Liam Steel for Company 

Come From Away 

Come From Away

MAGIC RADIO BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL

Caroline, Or Change at Playhouse Theatre

Company at Gielgud Theatre

The King And I at The London Palladium

Who I want to win: Company

Who I think will win: Company

 

BEST ACTOR IN A MUSICAL

Marc Antolin for Little Shop Of Horrors at Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith for Tina – The Tina Turner Musical at Aldwych Theatre

Zubin Varla for Fun Home at Young Vic

Ken Watanabe for The King And I at The London Palladium

 Who I want to win: Zubin Varla for Fun Home

Who I think will win: Ken Watanabe for The King And I

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL

Sharon D. Clarke for Caroline, Or Change at Playhouse Theatre

Rosalie Craig for Company at Gielgud Theatre

Kelli O’Hara for The King And I at The London Palladium

Adrienne Warren for Tina – The Tina Turner Musical at Aldwych Theatre

 Who I want to win: Sharon D. Clarke

Who I think will win: Sharon D. Clarke

 

CUNARD BEST REVIVAL

King Lear at Duke of York’s Theatre

The Lieutenant Of Inishmore at Noël Coward Theatre

The Price at Wyndham’s Theatre

Summer And Smoke at Almeida Theatre and Duke of York’s Theatre

 Who I want to win: Summer And Smoke

Who I think will win: Summer and Smoke

 

BEST NEW COMEDY

Home, I’m Darling at National Theatre – Dorfman and Duke of York’s Theatre

Nine Night at National Theatre – Dorfman and Trafalgar Studios 1

Quiz at Noël Coward Theatre

 Who I want to win: Nine Night

Who I think will win: Nine Night

 

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN AFFILIATE THEATRE

Moe Bar-El for his performance in Every Day I Make Greatness Happen at Hampstead Theatre Downstairs

Flesh And Bone at Soho Theatre

Jonathan Hyde for his performance in Gently Down The Stream at Park Theatre

The Phlebotomist at Hampstead Theatre Downstairs

Athena Stevens for Schism at Park Theatre

 Who I want to win: Flesh and Bone

Who I think will win: Jonathan Hyde 

 

WHITE LIGHT AWARD FOR BEST LIGHTING DESIGN

Neil Austin for Company

Howell Binkley for Come From Away

Jon Clark for The Inheritance

Lee Curran for Summer And Smoke

 Who I want to win: Jon Clarke for The Inheritance

Who I think will win: Neil Austin for Company

 

ROYAL ALBERT HALL AWARD FOR BEST SOUND DESIGN

Paul Arditti and Christopher Reid for The Inheritance

Mike Beer for A Monster Calls

Carolyn Downing for Summer And Smoke

Gareth Owen for Come From Away

Nick Powell for The Lehman Trilogy

Who I want to win: Mike Beer for A Monster Calls (this was glorious!)

Who I think will win: Paul Arditti and Christopher Reid for The Inheritance

 

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Fly Davis for Caroline, Or Change at Playhouse Theatre

Anna Fleischle for Home, I’m Darling at National Theatre – Dorfman and Duke of York’s Theatre

Gabriella Slade for Six at Arts Theatre

Catherine Zuber for The King And I at The London Palladium

Who I want to win: Catherine Zuber for The King And I

Who I think will win: Anna Fleischle for Home, I’m Darling

 

BLUE-I THEATRE TECHNOLOGY AWARD FOR BEST SET DESIGN

Bunny Christie for Company

Bob Crowley for The Inheritance

Es Devlin for The Lehman Trilogy

Anna Fleischle for Home, I’m Darling at National Theatre – Dorfman

Who I want to win: Bunny Christie for Company

Who I think will win: Bunny Christie for Company

 

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Keir Charles for Quiz at Noël Coward Theatre

Adam Gillen for Killer Joe at Trafalgar Studios 1

Adrian Lukis for The Price at Wyndham’s Theatre

Malcolm Sinclair for Pressure at Ambassadors Theatre

Chris Walley for The Lieutenant Of Inishmore at Noël Coward Theatre

 

Who I want to win: Malcolm Sinclair for Pressure at Ambassadors Theatre

Who I think will win: Chris Walley for The Lieutenant Of Inishmore

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Susan Brown for Home, I’m Darling at National Theatre

Monica Dolan for All About Eve at Noël Coward Theatre

Cecilia Noble for Nine Night at National Theatre – Dorfman and Trafalgar Studios 1

Vanessa Redgrave for The Inheritance at Young Vic and Noël Coward Theatre

Olivier Awards

Olivier Awards

Who I want to win: Monica Dolan for All About Eve (Dolan is excellent)

Who I think will win: Vanessa Redgrave for The Inheritance (Hmm)

 Monica and Gillian in All About Eve

Monica and Gillian in All About Eve

BEST ACTOR

Adam Godley, Ben Miles and Simon Russell Beale for The Lehman Trilogy at National Theatre – Lyttelton

Arinzé Kene for Misty at Trafalgar Studios 1

Ian McKellen for King Lear at Duke of York’s Theatre

Kyle Soller for The Inheritance at Young Vic and Noël Coward Theatre

David Suchet for The Price at Wyndham’s Theatre

Who I want to win: Kyle Soller for The Inheritance OR Arinzé Kene for Misty

Who I think will win: Ian McKellen for King Lear

 

BEST ACTRESS

Gillian Anderson for All About Eve at Noël Coward Theatre

Eileen Atkins for The Height Of The Storm at Wyndham’s Theatre

Patsy Ferran for Summer And Smoke at Almeida Theatre and Duke of York’s Theatre

Sophie Okonedo for Antony And Cleopatra at National Theatre – Olivier

Katherine Parkinson for Home, I’m Darling at National Theatre – Dorfman and Duke of York’s Theatre

Who I want to win: Patsy Ferran for Summer And Smoke

Who I think will win: Patsy Ferran for Summer And Smoke

 

SIR PETER HALL AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTOR

Christopher Ashley for Come From Away

Stephen Daldry for The Inheritance

Marianne Elliott for Company

Rebecca Frecknall for Summer And Smoke

Sam Mendes for The Lehman Trilogy 

Who I want to win: Marianne Elliott for Company

Who I think will win: Stephen Daldry for The Inheritance

 

AMERICAN AIRLINES BEST NEW PLAY

The Inheritance at Young Vic and Noël Coward Theatre

The Lehman Trilogy at National Theatre – Lyttelton

Misty at Trafalgar Studios 1

Sweat at Donmar Warehouse

Who I want to win: The Inheritance

Who I think will win: The Inheritance

 

MASTERCARD BEST NEW MUSICAL

Come From Away at Phoenix Theatre

Fun Home at Young Vic

Six at Arts Theatre

Tina – The Tina Turner Musical at Aldwych Theatre

 Who I want to win: Come From Away

Who I think will win: Six at Arts Theatre 

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is that.

Bookmark this page and come back on the night to see how I did, but be quick because I’m definitely going to come back and change all my predictions so that it looks like I knew what I was talking about.

 Cheers!

The Olivier Awards take place on April 7 at the Royal Albert Hall, hosted by Jason Manford.

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So, in 2017 who is getting it right?

Rufus Norris and Carol Ann Duffy

British Theatre is in a state of evolution and everyone has an opinion.

It’s all very confusing. *Stares wistfully out of the window*

This week, critic Michael Billington issued a brutal indictment of the National Theatre’s desertion of classic plays, stating: “A theatre that cuts itself off from its past is denying itself access to world masterpieces. Actors, designers and directors will eventually lose the ability to recreate the works of the past.”  His fellow-critic Matt Trueman responded aspersively: It’s safe to say there are more pressing matters than whether or not audiences appreciate the nuances of Jonson and Moliere.”

Meanwhile, playwright David Hare claimed that classic British drama is ‘being infected’ by radical European staging and the untraditional ‘distortion’ of plays. Lyn Gardner rebuffed this in the Guardian: “All theatre cultures have plenty they can learn from each other. It’s when you stop learning and become insular that theatre culture becomes desiccated and begins repeating itself. Particularly when it comes to classic texts.” I agree – there is room for everything. The debate over the value of new work versus revivals is as old as theatre itself.

Image result for NATIONAL THEATRE

All these opinions have been a joy to read, yet left me cold, angry and in the dark. Why?

It seems to me that there are now two quite separate theatre industries at play. One is generating all the quality stuff that tends to be hidden away. The other is spinning out mainstream froth in a void.

In a 2007 article, playwright Anthony Neilson wrote: “Boring an audience is the one true sin in theatre. We’ve been boring audiences for decades now, and they’ve responded by slowly withdrawing their patronage. I don’t care that the recent production of The Seagull at the Royal Court was sold out. To 95% of the population, the theatre (musicals aside for now) is an irrelevance. Of that 95%, we have managed to lure in maybe 10% at some point in their lives, and we’ve so swiftly and thoroughly bored them that they’ve never returned. They’re not the ones who broke the contract. They paid their money and expected entertainment; we sent them back into the night feeling bored, bullied and baffled. So what are we doing wrong?”

British Theatre should be leading the way in fostering genuinely exciting new work, because now more than ever (as we find ourselves isolated from Europe and tied to a toxic America) we need theatre with bite. In this dismal new world of “alternative facts” and “post-truth”, theatre needs to be properly amazing, i.e. not just a Wobble Board of traditional Ibsen and Ayckbourn.

It’s not all bad news. The state of the world has already inspired quality work at Theatre 503 in the form of ‘Top Trumps’, an evening of satirical plays by a range of writers responding to current affairs. This year at the NT, alongside crowd-pleasers like Angels In America and Imelda Staunton in Follies, Rufus Norris is throwing his hat in the ring with a new Brexit play, ‘My Country; A Work in Progress’, a verbatim piece collated from interviews, fine-tuned by poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy.

But for an industry that is apparently booming, there is little risk taking. There are only two big British West End musicals opening this year: Stiles and Drewe’s ‘The Wind in the Willows’ (London Palladium) and Gary Barlow/Tim Firth’s ‘The Girls’ (Phoenix Theatre). Meanwhile, rising ticket prices are pushing West End shows beyond the pockets of all but the affluent. This is bleak, right?

And perhaps restricted resources have limited artists’ disposition to experiment and progress. Traditionalists penalise anything outside a narrow idea of what theatre ‘should’ look like, but I believe that view favours short-term benefits for artists and the theatre as a whole. British theatre-makers should feel like they can do anything. But how can we persuade more people in power to take more chances? It’s worth speculating what might have happened to a cutting-edge writer like Barney Norris or Lucy Kirkwood if their first plays had received little to no mainstream support.

Cultural organisations dependent on public subsidy are preparing themselves for real-terms cuts as Arts Council England has cautioned standstill funding in the next round of national portfolio grants. How can we safeguard opportunities for our mid-career writers, composers, designers and directors to progress to greater spaces that are bountiful? The Arts Council urgently needs to take a chainsaw to publicly-funded rubbish and maybe also have a word with those commissioning work that is not fit for purpose.

Change is imperative – whatever Billington and Hare might say.

Guest Blog: The Royal Court’s Young Court

Published by www.ayoungertheatre.com on 04.04.2016

Looking great for 60, the Royal Court celebrates its milestone with an array of outward looking projects. Lynne Gagliano, Head of Young Court, sure knows how to throw a party. Heading up the Royal Court’s inclusive programme of activities for young people up to 21 years, Lynne cheers the Young Court projects which aim to make new theatre, offering active, direct experiences alongside the on-stage work.

“It’s all about unique learning exchanges across all departments, placing young people at our centre, fostering a live dialogue in which their views and ideas are valued and encouraging young people to discover their power to influence and change theatre.”

No party planner is without their badge of experience, and youth isn’t wasted on the young. She talks about her career and how she herself became involved with theatre at an early age. “I volunteered. My first volunteer job was at a venue I loved, the Gate Theatre in Notting Hill. It was a fantastic experience. I learned a huge amount in my time there and met people that I’m still working with today.”

Lynne trained at the Central School of Speech and Drama and, before that, taught Drama and English. How transferable are those skills in her current role? She explains, “The ability to collaborate successfully has helped me enormously in every theatre job I’ve had since leaving Central. Having worked as an English and Drama teacher has also helped me in countless ways in running an education department.”

With collaboration in mind, it’s clear the Court is really going all out to make this celebration as inclusive and open an opportunity as possible. “Being representative, and diversifying talent are core aims. We are driven by the aspiration for the Royal Court to be a proven place of opportunity for all with diverse and brilliant plays on stage and inclusive participation.” She goes on to add, “We actively seek, mentor, nurture and place writers and artists from the widest possible pool of talent and ensure that their work reaches audiences across London, nationally and internationally.”

She urges participants to let the Royal Court hear about their plans, “I think young playwrights need to try to do everything they can to let theatres know about their work. The new writing scene is incredibly robust and vibrant.”

One of the jewels in the Royal Court’s birthday crown is titled Open Court Festival. “This summer young people will be handed the keys to the Royal Court. The reins of each department are being handed over to the future of theatre. Our Youth Board and ten fantastic young writers will imagine, curate and produce a summer festival of new work. For three weeks in July, audiences can partake in thrilling, exciting events, performances, talks and projects.” Young people are not only invited to the party, but asked to shape the future years of the Royal Court, an iconic hot-bed of contemporary drama.

Source: Guest Blog: The Royal Court’s Young Court

ELF the Musical (Review)

Review of Elf the musical playing at the Dominion theatre, by Carl published in Theatre & Performance.

Review of Elf the musical by Carl Woodward