News and update about Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016

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THREE TALES OF LIFE AND DEATH-US comedy stars in three one-act plays at Assembly

Three Tales of Life and Death

In the world premiere of Pulitzer/Tony Award nominee Craig Lucas’s (Prelude to a KissAn American in ParisAmelie) zany and touching new play, THREE TALES OF LIFE AND DEATH, three stories collide in a world of voyeuristic theatre critics, bartenders with too much spirit and mysterious strangers looking for love in the afternoon.

In Phase 1, Love and Life, critics provide live commentary as the a couple make extra-marital love for the first time and the son of an overly anxious woman reflects on his mother and her tendencies to worry….,

In Phase 2, Death, as a bar tender is closing up for the night, a mysterious stranger walks in…

In Phase 3, Afterlife, in two separate scenes, two spirits encounter each other in Limbo and grapple with their former lives and what comes next.

Making their Edinburgh Fringe debuts, US comedy legends Richard Kline (of the US sitcom Three’s Company) and Pamela Shaw (Swingers), perform these three one-act plays directed by Manhattan Theater Club’s Associate Director Hunter Bird.

LISTINGS INFORMATION

Venue:                        Assembly (Front Room), 54 George Street, Edinburgh, EH2 2LR

Dates and Times:      3 – 26 August at 15.50 (not 6, 9, 15, 22 August)

Running Time:          65 mins

Tickets:                      £6 on 3 & 4 Aug

                                    £11 (£10) on 5, 6, 10, 14, 16, 17, 21, 23, 24 Aug

                                    £12 (£11) on 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26 Aug

Box Office:                0131 220 4348

 

 

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Edinburgh Fringe, Tago Korean Drum, Interview: “Our music is very sexy, intense, and sophisticated!”

TAGO Korean Drum II live
TAGO Korean Drum II live

TAGO Korean Drum II live

TAGO return to The Fringe 2017 with a new show which follows their enormously popular and successful Fringe debut last year.

‘FYI’ TAGO means ‘lighting up the world by beating drums’ and this young ensemble achieves it with a spectacular mixture of Korean traditional instruments – from gigantic drums to small percussion instruments – spiced up with extravagant martial arts movement.  TAGO’s performances are a masterful display of thrilling percussion and precisely choreographed movement that has wide audience appeal.

TAGO Korean Drum II live shot 4 players

TAGO Korean Drum II live shot 4 players

TAGO – KOREAN DRUM II is one of a collection of Korean shows at the 70th Edinburgh Festival Fringe supported by Korean Arts Management Service (KAMS), an affiliate of the Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism of Korea. The collection, which consists of MEDEA on media, Behind the Mirror, TAGO: Korean Drum, Mind Goblin and SNAP is part of Korea/UK 2017-18 presented by the Korean Cultural Centre UK, a year-long cultural exchange in partnership with leading British cultural institutions, set to bring the best of Korean art to the UK.

I thought it would be nice to talk to TAGO master drummer Kim Si-Won. I was right. It was quite nice.

Here is what happened.

Hi! Can you describe TAGO KOREAN DRUM?
TAGO master drummer Kim Si-Won:  Our music is very sexy, intense, and sophisticated!  Korean drums play an important part in traditional Korean music; it’s an art that has been passed from generation to generation for hundreds of years.  In TAGO we harness our traditional music with a more modern touch combining traditional Korean instruments – from gigantic drums to small percussion – with some exciting martial arts moves!  And we wanted to break the assumption that all drums are round so we’ve built a square drum and put strings and a wooden keyboard on it so it takes four of us to play it!

Performers are always busy rehearsing, preparing or performing; how do you relax?
That’s a good question Mr Carl!  We actually practise for 3-4 hours a day because you have to constantly develop strength and technique to play the drums…but we love to find new places to eat, drink and relax.  Edinburgh has some great bars and we’re looking forward to trying out some malt whiskies.

You recently took part in the London Korean Festival. How did audiences respond?
It was absolutely amazing!  We performed a 30 minute set against a colourful backdrop and the audience were dancing and cheering.  The Kensington Olympia venue is gigantic and the sound of our drums was perfect for the big acoustics.  They also had lots of Korean food stands so we felt right at home.  We signed lots of autographs too and did many selfies with audience members.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
Performing abroad, definitely!

How would you like this show to be remembered?
As a big, exciting and sexy show!  Also we would like people to enjoy the sounds of the different drums and percussion instruments, some of which you can only see if you come to Korea.

What do you like most about the city of Edinburgh?
The people are so friendly and the beer is great!  When we performed for the first time in 2016, we didn’t realise there were so many shows on – some of our Korean friends are here with their own shows – magic, illusion, dance, music – and we’re hoping to go and support some of them.  Last year we had to buy umbrellas…

TAGO Ho-goon Hyun on the big drum photo by Young Kyong

With the costs of putting on a show – what would be your advice for other international companies that want to bring work to Edinburgh Festival Fringe?
Don’t pack too much!  We send our biggest drums in advance and we take the smaller items on the plane with our luggage.  We could easily bring more then end up not playing them all – so, rather than have a big choice of instruments, we perform a specially designed international show that we know we can deliver.  If you try to pack everything, you can easily run out of money.

What is the Korean Arts scene like?
Really vibrant and diverse. The art of drumming has been around for centuries and you have to be very dedicated to train for many years before you can perform professionally.  Drummers usually started training intensely from the age of 10.  The K-Pop scene is huge now – Korean pop music – and young audiences are moving away from traditional art forms which is why our show is a combination of old and new.  Also the phenomenon of magic and illusion shows is very new to Korea and very popular and the Korean National Ballet (since 1993) is also very cool with people who like ballet.

What do you think audiences enjoy most about your work?
I think people really dig the huge sound of the drums – the sound really fills any performance space and it’s exciting to experience.  I think they also like our combination of drumming and martial arts moves – it’s a really hard thing to learn but very satisfying when you hear the audience cheering!

Are there any shows you are looking forward to seeing?
We are hoping to check out some comedy shows – we didn’t have chance last year – so we’re going to try and see Kwame Asante who we hear is a doctor as well as a comedian and our friends in the Korean magic show Snap which is also very funny.

 What is the most rewarding part of being a performer?
Being up there onstage with my friends is the best – we all met at university and set up Tago nearly 15 years ago.

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James Seager: Les Enfants Terribles’ Producer on Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the LET Awards and more

James Seager

James Seager

James Seager and Oliver Lansley are the masterminds behind Les Enfants Terribles. Their previous work includes multi-award-winning, international stage shows, including Dinner at the Twits, Alice’s Adventures Underground and The Vaudevillains. James Seager is Les Enfants Terribles’ Producer.

Last week I had a phone chat with Seager. We talked about the origins of their partnership. He says, “We met fifteen years ago, working on a Shakespeare play – As You Like It – and we are truly great friends. We direct together and have similar tastes,” he laughs. “We come up with ideas and 95% of the time it works, usually we are on the same page.”

Seager and Lansley recently announced the winners of the annual LET Awards. Nominees took part in a showcase at Greenwich Theatre. “It’s been pretty magic. The standard was the highest we have ever seen. We had over one hundred applicants – of which we shortlisted ten companies. All of them were brilliant and it was a very difficult decision to choose one winner.” 

Two winners were selected, Rendered Retina and BoonDog Theatre. Both will receive a performance slot at the Pleasance as part of Edinburgh Festival Fringe, £1000 cash as well as mentoring. “Rendered Retina are young, fresh and enthusiastic,” he says. “We could tell that they have a passion and genuine love for theatre. A lot of the decision was down to mine and Olly’s instinct; we felt that they could really benefit from our mentorship. What Rendered Retina did was inventive, slick and clever. Their work showed a great deal of potential for development. Both companies stood out.”

The Rendered Retina boys: Tom Mangan, Jordan Choi and Alex Mangan are upbeat about their recent win, “We are so honoured to have been offered this opportunity! The LET Awards gave us the chance to meet some incredibly talented artists and performers, and for that we are very grateful. We are excited to receive mentoring from LET, as well as the chance to showcase our work at the Edinburgh Fringe,” says Choi.

The winners of the LET Award 2017. Oliver Lansley, James Seager, (Tom Mangan, Jordan Choi, Alex Mangan - Rendered Retina Theatre Company) and Matthew Dwyer. Credit Anthony Hollis.jpg

The winners of the LET Award 2017. Oliver Lansley, James Seager, (Tom Mangan, Jordan Choi, Alex Mangan – Rendered Retina Theatre Company) and Matthew Dwyer. Credit Anthony Hollis

It’s behind Les Enfants Terribles’ love of facilitating opportunities for emerging talent, particularly the LET Awards, where their work shines. “This is the sixth year we’ve done this and there are two main ways in which we help. One is creatively; direction, storytelling and writing. Secondly: on a productivity level, we find that new company’s want more help with finance and accommodation. I.e. the nitty gritty and boring things involved in taking a show to Edinburgh. We have fifteen years under our belts of taking work to Edinburgh Fringe, so we are in a position to guide them. It’s quite expensive! Time slots, venue hire, accommodation, flyers, PR etc – it all adds up,” cautions Seager.
Les Enfant Terribles are providing an invaluable service for emerging talent.  It’s brilliant. Really very brilliant indeed. They have just announced The Stepladder Award, which is designed to support developing fringe theatre companies making original work. The emphasis of the award is on supporting a company to mount a professional tour of their Edinburgh Festival Fringe show and building their company profile and structure from the roots.

Taking a show to Edinburgh Fringe is no mean-feat. Balancing ambition with breaking even is nearly impossible, other benefits of appearing at Edinburgh are infinite. “The experience – its intense putting on a show and taking it to Edinburgh – it is a huge learning-curve,” says James. “It’s important to be there meeting new people, raising your profile and showcasing work where all the important people working in this industry are in one place. “

If the output of dynamic work is anything to go by, 2017 will see Les Enfants Terribles progress on to even more innovative projects. “As well as the Step Ladder programme, our sister company Les Petits Theatre Company have the stage adaptation of David Walliams’ ‘The First Hippo on the Moon’ out on a U.K Tour. ‘Alice Adventures Underground’ is back at The Vaults from April. We also have a brilliant outdoor show doing the Festival circuit over the summer and a really exciting show opening in London in October.” He pauses: “So, watch this space.”

ALICE’S ADVENTURE UNDERGROUND OPENS AT THE VAULTS ON 25 APRIL 2017

 

 

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Seiriol Davies: “It was important to me that when it hit Edinburgh, it was totally bullet proof”, talking about How to Win Against History.

Few Edinburgh Fringe shows make the kind of impact that How to Win Against History has. Having received high praise from (basically everyone) Janet Ellis and Complicite, the show is surely destined for another life.
We meet at Assembly Hall, George Square for a pint and a chat about the show, rejection, working the Fringe and more.

How to Win Against History

How to Win Against History runs at Assembly George Square Theatre until 28th August. Click on the image to book your tickets now!

I start by asking him how the show came to be, a musical focussing on Henry Paget, 5th Marquess of Anglesey who enjoys cross-dressing, he starts “The whole time we’ve made the show I was entirely convinced I was going to get pipped to the post by someone else, because it is – to me – such an obvious story. Henry was theatrical, what the French would call flamboyant, he spent all his family’s money putting on plays, with him in them and often dressed in lovely dresses made of diamonds. Upon his death his entire internal life had been deleted, so he’s the perfect kind of cypher character in a way.”

This is theatre at its most alive. We discuss the rave reviews, taking it in his stride. He appears genuinely humbled. “They are really lovely. They certainly impact the show in the way that they get people in. It will help us to tour it as well, which is my primary goal. I like reading reviews from audiences who get it on many levels and I like that the show has a broad appeal, it’s about using mainstream-ness to talk about what it means to be rejected by society.” He adds “To my knowledge, the worst review we’ve had said it would only appeal to a niche audience and that our Henry should have been more butch.”

I ask what the biggest challenges that he has faced with this piece were. “I was terrified going into the venue, because it’s so mini, but it’s been decked out beautifully. It’s actually eerily similar to the upstairs studio we first developed it in at Ovalhouse. Ovalhouse is an amazing engine for creating new work, and they’ve been instrumental in getting it off the ground. We’re really grateful to them and Pontio in Bangor, who are our Welsh partner, who made it possible for us to get to Edinburgh.”

One of the best things about Edinburgh Fringe is that it rewards risk-taking audiences, and everything is up for grabs. You hear people raving about it, and want to see it for yourself. How to Win Against History is doing very well here but I bet most of the audience never imagined they’d ever love a show dedicated to the lives and times of a cross dressing dancing Marquess, or would have booked to see it at their local theatre.

Davies is bringing a fresh approach, “I think it’s a shame when a musical is all like ‘scene scene plot talking talking scene SONG which-is-a-divergent-soliloquy-about-what-someone-is-feeling-inside then back to scene scene talking talking plot…’ I mean it can be that, sure, but you’ve got access to such an amazing breadth of ways of expressing stuff in musicals, and do so in ways that seem effortless to take in as an audience. So, you can move the story forward with a song, and at the same time subvert or mess with what the words are saying, using the music. There’s a song in the show about touring an increasingly difficult show, which moves the plot and characters forward a fair but, but also digs up all of our actorly bitterness towards critics, audiences, other actors and our own poncy ways and failures. But the song is a chirpy barbershop style, so it contrasts. I’m not sure that’s the best example of what I’m saying, but I’m tired and I’ve had a cider, so that’s my excuse.”

At this point, I pipe up that rejection is the greatest aphrodisiac. “I have not found this to be the case,” he says, smiling. “Except if you mean that people with low self esteem are easy to pull?” His humour is still intact.

Creatives at the festival pour their hearts and souls into shows to deliver the goods. How is he feeling right now, two thirds into the run? “I feel good. It feels really great to have momentum behind something like this when it has been so long in the making. It was important to me that when it hit Edinburgh, it was totally bullet proof.”

These origins make perfect sense. It has an unique energy behind it. The show’s incredible achievement is that it completely defies categorisation and that many, myself included, would probably never see outside a festival context.

His favourite musicals are a given, in terms of what you see of him, he is a very intelligent theatre creature. He says “Southpark the Musical, which is so unbelievably clever.” He smiles. “Oh God. Cabaret and Matilda!”

And there we have it.

How to Win Against History is at Edinburgh Fringe Festival until Aug 28.

CLICK HERE TO BUY YOUR TICKETS FOR HOW TO WIN AGAINST HISTORY

Click here to read the review of How to Win Against History by Dominic Cavendish in The Telegraph

 

 

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Mamoru Iriguchi ( 4D Cinema ) : ‘By having a screen around your face, you can make sure that everybody enjoys both the video and your face’

Mamoru Iriguchi

Mamoru Iriguchi

Mamoru Iriguchi is at Summerhall with 4D Cinema. I caught up with him and chatted about the challenges of being a performer at Edinburgh, technical difficulties and more.

Hi ya! Where are you and what are you doing currently?
In my flat (I live in Edinburgh) and drinking coffee. If this question is about my work, I am a theatre designer and performance maker.

How have audiences responded to 4D Cinema so far?
Very positively, I think.

In your show 4D Cinema – you sport a screen and a projector around your face – Where did the idea come from?
When you use video projection in your show, often the audience members only watch the projection and forget about your presence. By having a screen around your face, you can make sure that everybody enjoys both the video and your face.
4D Cinema is partly about the differences between live and filmed performances, so I wanted to place the two very closely.

What’s the hardest part about being a Fringe performer?
I think the hardest part would be sharing a bedroom with ten other performers. Luckily I am based in Edinburgh, so I do not have that. I wish I had more money to see more shows but this is probably a universal issue for everyone who works in art.

Do you read reviews of your work?
Yes, I cry with joy or despair while reading them.

How do you warm up physically, mentally and vocally for this show?
I cycle (uphill) to the venue everyday. I often take a cycle path around Arthur’s Seat and sing a song or two. I am ready when I get there.

Summerhall is quite remarkable isn’t it?
Yes there are lots of really great shows.

Have you been down the Royal Mile in your garb? It would be quite something.
I am afraid not, because, sadly, my projector is not battery-operated.

Have you had any technical difficulties?
Nothing other than my own clumsiness.

Anything you’d like to add? 
Please come to see 4D Cinema.

Story Pocket Theatre presents Michael Morpurgo’s King Arthur as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016,

The award winning Story Pocket Theatre presents Michael Morpurgo’s King Arthur from Wednesday 3 –Monday 29 August at Gilded Balloon at the Museum Auditorium, 14.45 (16.00 ends).

The production is an epic tale of magic, heroism, love and betrayal and is adapted from the novel Arthur: High King of Britain, by Michael Morpurgo. Michael is also Patron of Story Pocket Theatre and the author of War Horse and Private Peaceful.

David Gant as King Arthur

David Gant as King Arthur

‘Enthralling, high-quality adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s King Arthur for older children’ The Stage

The story sees a drowning boy rescued by a mysterious figure who claims to be Arthur Pendragon. As the old man tells his tales, he is transported back to the heady days of Camelot, the Round Table, Merlin, the Lady of the Lake, Excalibur, Lancelot and Guinevere. This production features the usual fast-moving family adventure, physical theatre and outstanding storytelling, long associated with multi-award-winning Story Pocket Theatre.

‘compelling adventure story filled with well-choreographed action and quality performances, and best suited to grip late primary school and early teenage viewers’ The List

Story Pocket Theatre are proud to announce that King Arthur will be played by star of stage and screen, David Gant who is known for his roles in Braveheart, Ghandi and Coriolanus at Chichester Festival Theatre. He also voiced Oswald of Carim in the  video game Dark Souls and Lord Aldia in the sequel, Dark Souls II. Gant is an Associate and Licentiate of the London College of Music. Sarine Sofair will play the roles of Guinevere and Lady of the Lake. She recently understudied Carey Mulligan in David Hare’s Skylight at the Wyndhams Theatre, but is best known for her film and TV work such as Lhara in HBO’s Game of Thrones, Bell in The Rizen II, Yvonne in The Look of Love with Steve Coogan, directed by Michael Winterbottom and in Anna Karenina by Joe Wright. And Thomas Gilbey play young Arthur, he was one of the lead puppeteers on the National Theatre’s UK and South African tours of War Horse.  King Arthur is adapted by Adam Fletcher-Forde, co-directed by Julia Black and Adam Fletcher-Forde with original music by George Jennings.

David Gant                     Storyteller, Merlin

Thomas Gilbey             The Boy, Young Arthur

Nigel Munson               Minstrel, Morgana Le Fey, Wounded Knight 2, Green Knight, Mordred, Percivale

Otis Waby                      Kay, Leodegraunce, Wounded Knight 1, Lancelot, Bedevere

McKenzie Scott            Egbert, Pelinore, Gawain, Galahad

Luke Pitman                  Bercelet, Old Man

Sarine Sofair                 Squire, Guinevere, Morgana Le Fey, Lady Nemue, Green Wife, Mum

Story Pocket Theatre was set up in 2013 from a passion to produce beautiful, wonderful and magical theatre for families. In 2014 the company was awarded the Primary Times Children’s Choice and in 2015 the Three Weeks Editors’ Choice Award.

The theatre company’s Patron, Michael Morpurgo says ‘It was apparent straight away that Story Pocket’s focus was on sharing stories in a bright, imaginative way. My passion for stories and writing has taken me all over the world and I am lucky enough to see my stories in print and on stage and screen. It was Story Pocket’s passion for story telling that struck me… I am delighted to be the Patron of Story Pocket Theatre Company.’

LISTINGS INFORMATION: Michael Morpurgo’s King Arthur at Gilded Balloon at the Museum Auditorium from Wednesday 3 – Monday 29 August (not Tuesday 16 & Monday 22), 14.45 (16.00 ends). Suitable for 7 +

Ticket prices £6, £8, £10 & £12. Box office 0131 622 6552 www.gildedballoon.co.uk

Twitter @story_pocket, website www.storypockettheatre.co.uk

Solo tour-de-force Scorch puts gender identity centre stage at Edinburgh Festival Fringe

Scorch is presented by Primecut Productions at Paines Plough’s Roundabout at Summerhall and sees the Fringe debut for award-winning Northern Irish playwright Stacey Gregg. Directed by Emma Jordan (Paul Hamlyn Cultural Entrepreneurship Breakthrough Award) and performed by Amy McAllister (Call the MidwifePhilomena) the production showcases the work of three of the most exciting voices in Northern Irish theatre today. The play is a new original work from Belfast playwright Stacey Gregg and explores issues surrounding gender disclosure experienced by a contemporary teenager.

Scorch

Scorch

Scorch gained further international recognition after it won the Irish Times theatre award for Best New Play of 2015 and has recently won Best New Play at the Writer’s Guild of Ireland ZeBBie Awards.

Inspired by recent court cases and set in the round, Amy McAllister plays Kes, a troubled teenage girl struggling with her gender identity. Kes explores her sexuality and gender by posing as a boy who embarks on an intimate relationship with another girl, which leads to devastating effects both legally and personally. At times funny, poignant and explosive, Scorch is a story of first love through the eyes of a gender-curious teen and examines how the human story often gets lost amidst the headlines.
Presented by Prime Cut Productions; Scorch is directed by Emma Jordan, produced by Una NicEoin and written by Stacey Gregg. Featuring Design/LX by Ciaran Bagnall, Sound Design by Carl Kennedy and Costume Design by Enda Kenny. The production and associated outreach activity is made possible through funding provided by the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Belfast City Council and Paul Hamlyn Foundation.
2016 marks the third year of Roundabout, Paines Plough’s award-winning portable in-the-round auditorium. It will take up residency once again at Summerhall during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from 4 – 29 August.

The real life issue takes on heightened dramatic resonance, fractured and splintered by Gregg’s syncopated prose style”

★★★★ Irish Times

McAllister deftly deals with the emotions involved: incredulity, sadness, fear and the lingering confusion”

★★★★ GiggingNI

Listings Information:

Scorch

Venue: Paines Plough’s Roundabout at Summerhall

Dates & Times: 18.05 (55 mins)5 – 28 August (not Tuesdays 9, 16, 23)

Tickets: Previews 5,6,7, August: £9

10, 11, 15, 17, 18, 22, 24, 25, 29 August: £14 (full) £12 (conc)
8, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 August: £16 (full) £14 (conc)
Box Office: 0131 226 000 / 0131 560 1581 tickets.edfringe.com or summerhall.co.uk

Prime Cut Productions Theatre CompanyBased in Belfast, Northern Ireland and formed in 1992, Prime Cut Productions is at the forefront of contemporary international theatre across the island of Ireland. With over 30 Irish and Northern Irish premieres to their name, Prime Cut have a reputation for producing award-winning, critically acclaimed professional theatre, that challenges, provokes, inspires, entertains and enthrals.

About Paines Plough. Plough is the UK’s national theatre of new plays. The company commissions and produces the best playwrights and tours their plays far and wide. Whether you’re in Liverpool or Lyme Regis, Scarborough or Southampton, a Paines Plough show is coming to a theatre near you soon.
Paines Plough was formed in 1974 over a pint of Paines bitter in the Plough pub. Since then they’ve produced more than 130 new productions by world renowned playwrights like Stephen Jeffreys, Abi Morgan, Sarah Kane, Mark Ravenhill, Dennis Kelly and Mike Bartlett.
2016 marks the third year of Roundabout, Paines Plough’s award-winning portable in-the-round auditorium. The Roundabout season will preview from 19 – 24 July at Hackney Showroom in London before taking up residency once again at Summerhall during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from 4 – 29 August

BIG IN BELGIUM – at Summerhall, Edinburgh from 3 – 28 August 2016

Following the huge success of the three previous seasons at Summerhall, Big in Belgium, Richard Jordan Productions, Summerhall and Theatre Royal Plymouth return to present a fourth BIG IN BELGIUM at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe – featuring some of the most significant theatre companies from the Flemish part of Belgium.  Each of the shows in this season has previously been very successful on the European mainland and are now presented for the first time to Edinburgh audiences, some translated and adapted, ready for breaking new grounds in English-speaking territories.

One Hundred Homes

One Hundred Homes

For this year’s festival a theme emerged.  In one way or another, most shows are talking about a sense of homely safety. Whether literally in the case of ONE HUNDRED HOMES or more generally as in Ontroerend Goed’s WORLD WITHOUT US, it feels like Belgian artists feel the need to think abouut the disapearance of the places where we are most comfortable.

Contemporary arts are always reflections on contemorary issues.  When major devestating events happen close to where you live they will, without fail, penetrate your way of thinking, change the way you act and influence what you create.  In a large or small way all shows in this collection show awareness of recent European history and BIG IN BELGIUM hopes to take you on a journey where you question your own points of view in light of the recent reality.

In BILDRAUM, which opens at Summerhall on 16 August, an architect and a photographer compose an audio-visual story live on stage.  By reconstructing spaces in which memories once took place, different storylines slowly unfold, like browsing a photo album created on the spot.  The two performers act as technicians of the imagination using architectural models, live photography, sounds and music to unite the visual and special into a surprising performance.  A brilliant award-winning original show where the past and present seem to coincide and the audience themselves gradually develop the connections in between. http://www.atelierbildraum.com/

A teenage girl runs away from home to a nearby city.  Nobody notices her but there is actually someone looking out for her?  In LAST CALL which can be seen at Summerhall from 3 August (press from 5 August), Belgium’s foremost graphic novelist, Philip Parquet and playwright Adriaan Van Aken’s urban adult comic book is brought vividly to life, fusing live voices, dynamic video, projection, sound and music into a thrilling after-dark fantasia of theatre and art.  From the producers of Summerhall hits Tourniquet (2013), Looking for Paul (2014) and The Great Downhill Journey of Little Tommy (2015), you won’t want to miss this year’s new late-night cult Fringe show. http://www.nieuwstedelijk.be/

Macbeth and Kurt Cobain and Lady Macbeth and Courtney Love inspire MACBAIN a pitch-black comedy by Gerardjan Rijnders about unbridled ambition, hunger for power and an addiction to intoxication and ecstasy which opens in Summerhall’s Old Lab on 5 August.  Dood Paard’s triptych of hilarious interviews with the pop stars, a freaky fast-forward puppet version of Macbeth which results in a merciless symbiosis of the grunge couple Cobain-Love and the Thanes of Cawdor.  A crazy journey into the world of two seriously troubled people who are trying to escape from their mental prison, as the loneliness howls through the room and the attempts to reverse the inevitable end are heart-breaking.

http://www.doodpaard.nl/nieuws

Yinka Kuitenbrouwer visited over one hundred people.  She talked to them about the idea of ‘home’.  With the help of snapshots, quotes and biscuits, Yinka created a new story – ONE HUNDRED HOMES        , which opens at Summerhall on 3 August (press from 5 August).  An intimate performance, played out in a small wooden cabin specially built in Summerhall’s Courtyard, ONE HUNDRED HOMES is an ongoing performance; each time Yinka performs the play, she also visits people in the area, adding their stories to her archives.  During her stay at the Fringe, Yinka will continue to collect her impressions in the Edinburgh area, visiting residents, artists and visitors.  https://honderdhuizen.wordpress.com/

BRONKS present US/THEM at Summerhall from 3 August (press from 5 August).  During a hostage drama in a school in Beslan that started in September 2004, the greatest of evils, terrorists, chose the greatest good – a group of children as their victims.  US/THEM is not a straightforward account of this terrible drama, but is about the entirely individual way that children cope with extreme situations.  With humour and a matter-of-fact approach, it contrasts the views of children with those of adults, Brussels-based BRONKS is one of Belgium’s leading theatres for young audiences.  A lightness of storytelling, breath-taking scenography and a strong cast create a thrilling, unmissable theatrical experience. http://www.bronks.be/en/

Edinburgh favourites Ontroerend Goed present their latest production, WORLD WITHOUT US at Summerhall from 3 August (press from 5 August).  We could hardly imagine it; no mortgages, no knitting scarves, no swimming pools, no butterfly strokes and no honey kept in glass bowls.  Animals would no longer be stuffed, skyscrapers no longer built, no more suicide and no mathematics.  There would be no more talk about the old days, about what’s possible.  There would be no words.  It would never happen.  We’d find a solution.  A world without us.  Multiple Fringe First award winners Ontroerend Goed return to Edinburgh with their new piece about the end of humanity and what comes after. http://www.ontroerendgoed.be/en/

LISTINGS INFORMATION

 Venue:                         Summerhall, Summerhall Place, Edinburgh EH9 1QH

Box Office:                  0845 874 3001

Production:                 Bildraum

Dates and Times:        16 – 28 August at 20.55 (not 22 Aug)

Running Time:             40 mins

Tickets:                       £10 (£8 concessions)

 

Production:                 Last Call

Dates and Times:        3 – 28 August at 22.40   (No performances 8, 14, 15, 22 August)

Running Time:             65 mins

Tickets:                       3 August – all tickets £8

5 – 28 Aug £10 (£8 concessions)

 

 Production:                MacBain

Dates and Times:        3 – 14 August at 20.55   (No performance 8 August)

Running Time:             75 mins

Tickets:                       £10 (£8 concessions)

 

Production:                 One Hundred Homes

Dates and Times:        3 – 28 August at 14.05

Running Time:             50 mins

Tickets:                       3 & 4 August – all tickets £8

5 – 28 Aug £10 (£8 concessions)

 

Production:                 US/THEM

Dates and Times:        3 – 28 August at 10.00 (not 8, 14, 15, 22 August)

Running Time:             60 mins

Tickets:                       £10 (£8 concessions)

 

Production:                 WORLD WITHOUT US

Dates and Times:        3 – 28 August at 11.30 (not 8,15, 22 August)

Running Time:             90 mins

Tickets:                       3 & 4 August – all tickets £10

5 – 28 Aug £12 (£10 concessions)

 

Goggles – a quirky comedy about love, loss, loneliness and fish presented by ThisEgg

Gemma and Josie had pet fish, Sunny and Boo. But now they are dead. As they remember watching their pet fish live harmoniously in a bowl, Gemma and Josie wonder if they love each other as much as Sunny and Boo had loved each other. They think about whether it would be possible to love each other more. They think that might be too much, but then they think about living without one another.

Goggles

Goggles

This is a quirky comedy about keeping afloat. It is an attempt to give Sunny and Boo the happy ending they deserved…

Goggles plays with how we can make what we imagine become real. It is about doing something to right a wrong. It is about the struggle to keep a friendship in balance. Devised and Performed by Gemma Barnett and Josie Dale-Jones, this is an imaginative piece of comic theatre charged with vitality and immediacy.

Past achievements for ThisEgg:

“This theatre company is definitely one to keep an eye on.” 

Edinburgh Spotlight

WINNER OF BEST HIDDEN GEM AWARD 2014

EntertainmentWise

Short Listed for the

NSDF EDINBURGH EMERGING ARTISTS AWARD 2014

★★★★★ “delivered to perfection” 

Pick of the Fringe’ Stage Won (Spaghetti Junction 2012)

★★★★

Fest (Please Don’t Cry (At My Funeral) 2014)

★★★★  “eccentric, hilarious, buzzing” 

Fringe Biscuit (Spaghetti Junction 2012)

Venue: Pleasance Courtyard, Attic

Dates: 3-29th August (excl 16th)

Time: 14.00-15.00

Web: www.thisegg.co.uk

 

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Us/Them – a crisp, witty, playful and stylish piece of physical theatre for young audiences

Us/Them is taking Summer Hall by storm. And rightly so. It is a highly impressive piece of physical theatre. This is a crisp, witty, playful and stylish piece for young audiences by Belgian Theatre company Bronks and has super producer Richard Jordan‘s fingerprints all over it.

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Click the image to book your tickets for Us/Them

This striking show tells the story of the 2004 siege of a school by Chechen separatist with breathtaking originality.

The opening section set the tone for the piece, which plays across a range of emotions, as humour and  playfulness coexist with much darker and disturbing content. The harrowing, yet innovative storytelling are edited and integrated from the start of performance, providing a narrative from which the rest of the piece extended.  Skillfulness of movement and expression is evident in the way text is rendered.

What really stands out is the strong communication with the audience through vocal and facial work supported by building anticipation as to what was coming next.

A range of dynamics within movement work prevent any slippage of attention. This means that when the surprises in the devastatingly simple set design are unveiled, a strong theatrical context is created.

This two hander is played electrically by Gytha Parmentier, Roman Van Houtven.
Their duet sequences are magnificently developed to remind the audience of the tragic story of the siege we hear but through subtle re-working of imagery rather than anything sentimental. I’ll never look at chalk in the same way again.

CLICK HERE TO BOOK YOUR TICKETS FOR US/THEM