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Edinburgh Fringe Diary: Day 2

Edfringe Diary -Day 2

Edfringe Diary -Day 2

What’s worse than

Pippin? 

Pippin without an interval. The Stephen Schwartz musical, originally directed by Bob Fosse, ran for 2,000 performances on Broadway. In London, it managed only 85.

This turgid youth-led production manages to be relentless and unforgivably off-key: the vocals are all over the place and the costume looks like someone has raided a clothing bank. Do you know what, this musical is not bad if you like this sort of thing, which I don’t and you probably don’t either. But still.

The whole thing seems like a massive ball-ache to be honest.

Ambitious themes pay off for Strictly Arts’ and Camilla Whitehill new play: Freeman at Pleasance Courtyard.

The piece explores the link between racism and mental health in a vibrant, uplifting, major-key 60 minutes. Regressive views on race are still dangerously pervasive. But this cast just clobber you.

Freeman can’t help but serve as a rallying cry, but it is more than a clarion call. It’s an exciting theatre thing. I.e. quite simply, totally good.

The End of Eddy opened this week at the Edinburgh International Festival ahead of its run at the Unicorn and Dublin Theatre Festival.

This slick coming of age two-hander is analytically adapted from the autobiographical novel by Édouard Louis. The two wide-eyed performers, Alex Austin and Kwaku Mills, work in tandem to deliver a profound and deeply moving 90 minutes that examines class, bullying, identity & homophobia. It really spoke to me.

Overall, a thoroughly intelligent, inspired and good-natured piece of theatre. A festival highlight for me.

Carl Woodward and a Drag Queen

Carl Woodward and a Drag Queen

Prom Kween in the Piccolo Tent is actually quite good, you know. The best zeitgeist satirical comedy in this year’s set of hopefuls, anyway. It feels basically like a show about becoming a drag queen. The subject is enticing: our hero Matthew wants to win his High School Prom and ends up competing against the stereotypes associated. A satirical and anarchic 60 minuted ensues.

The Ru-Paul inspired production doesn’t work quite as well as it should but this is a solid piece in a fun sort of way. It has a talented ensemble cast in teeny shorts, and who slip in a second from America hillbilly to Cher and reflective to wigged-up and glam and there are some real laugh out loud moments, but more light is required.

You better werk, etc.

A fun day.

Here is a photo of me with a drag queen. You’re welcome.